GaN Talk a blog dedicated to crushing silicon
Term: Lidar
16 post(s) found

CES is the Global Stage for Innovation

CES is the Global Stage for Innovation
Dec 30 2018

World-changing innovations such as the first video cassette recorder (VCR) in 1970 to the world’s first laptop that can charge wirelessly have been announced at CES, the worlds gathering place for innovation.

World-changing innovations and Gallium Nitride (GaN), a critical building-block component behind many of today’s new and exciting consumer technology innovations such as self-driving cars, robots, drones, wireless power solutions, world-class audio and cutting-edge automotive solutions go hand in hand.

Designing LiDAR and more into Autonomous E racing

Designing LiDAR and more into Autonomous E racing
Aug 27 2018

This post, authored by Steve Taranovich, Editor-in-Chief, Planet Analog was originally published August 10, 2018 on the Planet Analog website. Learn more about eGaN technology and EPC GaN solutions for LiDAR.

I have a pathological interest in the promotion of electric vehicles; Formula E racing is one of the most exciting venues for techies like myself. See some of my articles on Formula E in the links at the end of this blog.

What caught my eye recently was a ROBORACE video at a Formula E race track in Rome, Italy:

Driving GaN Into The Fast Lane

Driving GaN Into The Fast Lane
Jun 12 2018

Ask EPC's chief executive, Alex Lidow, what the future holds for his GaN power device business, and automotive certification features prominently.

Recently delivering AEC Q101-qualified 80 V discrete transistors for LiDAR, 48V power distribution systems and other applications, the company's latest enhancement-mode FETs deliver higher switching frequencies and efficiencies than silicon MOSFETs, in a smaller footprint. And this is just the beginning.

"We have more transistors as well as integrated circuits designed for LiDAR [sensors] and are proceeding with automotive certification here," highlights Lidow. "LiDAR is under intense cost and performance pressure so integrating components and improving performance while lowering the cost is a big deal."

eGaN Technology is Coming to Cars

eGaN Technology is Coming to Cars
May 01 2018

Automotive technology has entered a renaissance with the emergence of autonomous cars and electric propulsion as the driving forces.  IHS Markit estimates that 12 million cars will be autonomous by 2035 and 32 million cars will have electric propulsion according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Marklines.  Both trends translate into a large growth in demand for power semiconductors.  This is also happening at a time when silicon is reaching its performance limits in the world of power conversion, thus opening a huge new market for power devices based on gallium nitride grown on a silicon substrate (GaN-on-Si). 

APEC 2018: GaN Revolution in the World of Power Electronics

APEC 2018: GaN Revolution in the World of Power Electronics
Feb 28 2018

Come see the world’s smallest, most efficient, and lowest cost DC-DC converters!  eGaN technology makes this, and much more possible and will be on full display at this year’s American Power Engineering Conference, APEC, where power engineers from around the world gather to see and learn about the latest innovations and products available in the world of power electronics.

EPC GaN experts will be presenting a half-day educational seminar on the state of GaN technology and its application to leading-edge power electronics. In addition, EPC will deliver six technical sessions, as well as demonstrate eGaN applications in our booth and customer suite.

Join EPC at CES 2018

Join EPC at CES 2018
Jan 01 2018

We are quite excited about this year’s CES being held in Las Vegas from January 9th through the 12th.  Our excitement is grounded in the fact that we will be showing the power of GaN technology in two locations – within the AirFuel™ Alliance booth at the Sands Hotel and in our hospitality suite at the Venetian hotel!

GaN Puts the “D” in LiDAR for Autonomous Vehicles… Enhancing the “Eyesight” of Self-Driving Cars

GaN Puts the “D” in LiDAR for Autonomous Vehicles… Enhancing the “Eyesight” of Self-Driving Cars
Dec 06 2017

Did you see that car? The one with what looks like antlers on the top? Most people would be hard-pressed to miss a self-driving car navigating about public roads. Most autonomous vehicles, or self-driving cars as they are also known, are outfitted with a myriad of sensors, cameras, and even lasers that serve a critical function – providing information about the vehicle’s surroundings. These sensors and cameras are one means of identifying pedestrians, bicycle riders, lane lines, street signs, lights, traffic cones, and other visual details that are important for safe driving.

LASER Safety in a LiDAR World

LASER Safety in a LiDAR World
Jun 05 2017

This post was originally published on Velodyne LiDAR’s “360” Blog. Learn more about eGaN technology here and EPC GaN solutions for LiDAR here.

Have you ever been driving at night—perhaps on a twisty two-lane highway—when the headlights of an oncoming car seemingly “crash” into your retinas? Blue-tinged LED beams leap out from behind a curve, or crest over a hillside, and for an instant it feels like you may have gone blind. Your vision erupts with a painful jolt of white. You squint through patchy discolorations trying to locate the lane lines. A quick flip of your high beams results in an even brighter display from the oncoming car. And now there are two drivers swerving past one another who couldn’t read the top line at the eye doctor.

As nighttime images of the earth from the International Space Station confirm, ours is an increasingly illuminated world. And LEDs, or light emitting diodes, supply a cheap and efficient means for broad illumination, not just for vehicles but increasingly for street lighting. Yet some types of LEDs have recently raised concerns of associated health risks.

Four Ways GaN Technology Helps Save the Planet

Four Ways GaN Technology Helps Save the Planet
Apr 11 2017

Gallium nitride (GaN) is a better semiconductor than silicon. There are many crystals that are better than silicon, but the problem has always been that they are far too expensive to be used in every application where silicon is used. But, GaN can be grown as an inexpensive thin layer on top of a standard silicon wafer enabling devices that are faster, smaller, more efficient, and less costly than their aging silicon counterparts.