GaN Talk a blog dedicated to crushing silicon
Term: ICs
3 post(s) found

Pulsing 1550 nm Lasers for Lidar

Pulsing 1550 nm Lasers for Lidar
Apr 20 2021

Pulsed lidar systems typically use either 905 nm or 1550 nm lasers for optical emission.  Above 1400 nm, various elements of the eye absorb the light, impeding it from reaching and damaging the retina.  As laser power is increased, not all of it is absorbed, and at some point, retinal damage may occur.  Since 905 nm light does not get absorbed, it does reach the retina, so care must be used to limit the energy density to prevent damage.

If the decision is to use 1550 nm light, efficiency differences in the semiconductor laser make it necessary to use higher current for the same optical power emitted compared with 905 nm light.  Additionally, the same characteristics that allow the light to be absorbed by the eye before getting to the retina cause it to be absorbed by the atmosphere.  This phenomenon is amplified as humidity increases to fog, rain, or snow.  The drive power required for a 1550 nm laser may be up to 10 times higher than for a 905 nm laser based system.  Fortunately, there is a solution to deliver the power necessary to drive 1550 nm lasers while maintaining the edge speed and pulse required for high resolution in pulsed lidar applications.

eToF™ Laser Driver ICs for Advanced Autonomy Lidar

eToF™ Laser Driver ICs for Advanced Autonomy Lidar
Mar 22 2021

Co-written by Steve Colino

Laser drivers for light distancing and ranging (lidar) are used in a pulsed-power mode. What are the basic requirements for these laser drivers?

A new family of integrated laser driver ICs meets all these requirements.  The first release, the EPC21601 laser driver IC, integrates a 40 V, 10 A FET with integrated gate driver and 3.3 V logic level input in a single chip for time-of-flight (ToF) lidar systems used in robotics, surveillance systems, drones, autonomous cars, and vacuum cleaners. This chip offers frequency capability up to 200 MHz in a low inductance, economical, 1 mm x 1.5 mm BGA package.

More Data, More Apps, More Mobile…

More Data, More Apps, More Mobile…
Oct 18 2017

I don’t know about you, but in my house the number of mobile devices seems to multiply overnight, along with the ways they are used.  On any given night, you may find me on a GoToMeeting conference on my laptop, my husband on a video Skype chat from his phone with his dad in Florida, my oldest son turning in an assignment on Google Classroom from his laptop, my younger son streaming videos on his tablet, and my second grader recording and posting a music.ly on her phablet.  And when we travel, these devices come with us so they need to be small and lightweight enough to come along for ride! 

This all translates into ever-increasing power demands for computing and telecom systems and the conflicting desire for small, lightweight form factors, and extended battery life. To meet these demands, point-of-load (POL) DC-DC converters (the power engines) need to be designed to be small sized and as efficient as possible. These demands translate to ever faster switching frequencies of the transistors used in the power conversion running these devices. Notebook PCs, tablets, and phablets are especially sensitive to this need as our dependency on these devices and the demands we make on them continues to grow.