GaN Talk a blog dedicated to crushing silicon
Term: 48V
5 post(s) found

How to Get More Power Out of a High-Density eGaN®-Based Converter with a Heatsink

How to Get More Power Out of a High-Density eGaN®-Based Converter with a Heatsink
Dec 14 2018

eGaN FETs and ICs enable very high-density power converter design, owing to their compact size, ultra-fast switching, and low on-resistance. The limiting factor for output power in most high-density converters is junction temperature, which prompts the need for more effective thermal design. The chip-scale packaging of eGaN also offers six-sided cooling, with effective heat extraction from the bottom, top, and sides of the die. This application note presents a high-performance thermal solution to extend the output current capability of eGaN-based converters.

GaN Rising as Power Chain Option as Energy Demand, Cost Grows

GaN Rising as Power Chain Option as Energy Demand, Cost Grows
Nov 29 2018

This post was originally published by Bill Kleyman on November 5, 2018 on the Data Center Frontier  web site. Learn more about eGaN technology and EPC GaN solutions for the Data Center.

The data center is an ever-changing entity and part of our technological landscape. But sometimes the biggest changes in the colocation industry happen at the core of what makes a data center tick, and may not be visible at first glance. In this instance, we’re talking about data center power, and the potential of creative solutions on the market, such as using Gallium nitride (GaN) in power conversion equipment.

How to Design an eGaN FET-Based Power Stage with an Optimal Layout

How to Design an eGaN FET-Based Power Stage with an Optimal Layout
Oct 24 2018

Motivation

eGaN FETs are capable of switching much faster than Si MOSFETs, requiring more careful consideration of PCB layout design to minimize parasitic inductances. Parasitic inductances cause higher overshoot voltages and slower switching transitions. This application note reviews the key steps to design an optimal power stage layout with eGaN FETs, to avoid these unwanted effects and maximize the converter performance.

Impact of parasitic inductance on switching behavior

As shown in figure 1, three parasitic inductances can limit switching performance 1) power loop inductance (Lloop), 2) gate loop inductance (Lg), and 3) common-source inductance (Ls). The chip-scale package of eGaN FETs eliminates any significant inductance within the transistor itself, leaving the printed circuit board (PCB) as the main contributor. Each parasitic inductance is a consequence of the total area encompassed by the dynamic current path and its return loop. (See WP009: Impact of Parasitics on Performance).

A 95%-Efficient 48 V-to-1 V/10 A VRM Hybrid Converter

A 95%-Efficient 48 V-to-1 V/10 A VRM Hybrid Converter
Oct 07 2018

Gab-Su Seo1,2, Ratul Das1, and Hanh-Phuc Le1
1Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, University of Colorado
2Power Systems Engineering Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Colorado, U.S.A.

With drastically increasing demands for cloud computing and big data processing, the electric energy consumption of data centers in the U.S. is expected to reach 73 billion kWh by 2020 [1], which will account for approximately 10% of the U.S total electric energy consumption. A large portion of this consumption is caused by losses from inefficient power delivery architectures that require a lot of attention for improvements [2], [3].

eGaN Technology is Coming to Cars

eGaN Technology is Coming to Cars
May 01 2018

Automotive technology has entered a renaissance with the emergence of autonomous cars and electric propulsion as the driving forces.  IHS Markit estimates that 12 million cars will be autonomous by 2035 and 32 million cars will have electric propulsion according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Marklines.  Both trends translate into a large growth in demand for power semiconductors.  This is also happening at a time when silicon is reaching its performance limits in the world of power conversion, thus opening a huge new market for power devices based on gallium nitride grown on a silicon substrate (GaN-on-Si).